Dana Stabenow Books

Dana Stabenow is an American Author born in 1952. Before taking a chance on the UAA MFA program and making the decision to become an author, Stabenow worked as a journalist, having received her degree in 1973 from the University of Alaska.

Order of Kate Shugak Series

Order of Silk and Song Trilogy Series

Order of Liam Campbell Series

# Read Title Published
1 Fire And Ice 1998
2 So Sure Of Death 1999
3 Nothing Gold Can Stay 2000
4 Better To Rest 2002
5 The Collected Short Stories 2013

Order of Star Svensdotter Series

# Read Title Published
1 Second Star 1991
2 A Handful Of Stars 1991
3 Red Planet Run 1995

Order of Coast Guard Series

# Read Title Published
1 Blindfold Game 2005
2 Prepared For Rage 2008

Order of Dana Stabenow Non-Fiction Books

# Read Title Published
1 Alaska Traveler 2012

Anthologies/Collaborations

# Read Title Published
1 The Mysterious North 2002
2 Alaska Women Write 2003
3 Wild Crimes 2004
4 Powers Of Detection 2004
5 At the Scene of the Crime 2008
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Raised in the Gulf of Alaska, Dana saw writing as the sort of career that would allow her to pursue life in warmer and dryer climates. She battled with seasickness for a long time and often wrote stories about other children who lived far from the sea, unlike her. While working for the TransAlaska Pipeline and struggling to achieve any significant financial success, Dana spent a lot of time pondering her future.

The MFA degree she acquired in 1985 promised greater opportunities in publishing. However, life as an author didn’t immediately bear fruits. Second Star, Dana Stabenow’s first science fiction novel disappeared into obscurity almost as soon as it hit the shelves. Luckily for Dana, she persevered, pushing her crime fiction novel ‘A Cold Day for Murder’ out and beginning an avalanche of victories.

A writer of historical adventure, science fiction, mystery and thriller, Dana Stabenow has attracted considerable acclaim for her Kate Shugak Mystery series.

Despite having sought warmer regions during her earlier years, Dana still lives in Alaska. Many of her books are also set in this location.

Dana Stabenow Awards

One of Dana’s earliest novels, A Cold Day for Murder earned her an Edgar Award in 1993 (Best Paperback Original). She can also boast of her Nero Award, received in 2012 for Though Not Dead, another book in the Kate Shugak Mystery series.

Dana Stabenow Books into Movies

There has been a lot of talk about a Television Series based on the Kate Shugak series of novels; nothing has materialized as of yet. However, the project hasn’t been permanently shelved.

Best Dana Stabenow Books

Dana Stabenow is something truly special, one of those rare authors that produce mystery/suspense novels which are consistently good, with some of the best novels under her name including the following:

Though Not Dead: Sam Dementieff was one of the oldest members of Alaska’s largest national park. As such, the death of the 87-year-old comes as a surprise to everyone. Sam had no children of his own.

However, everyone called him the father of all the park rats, a term he accepted and nurtured. To Investigator Kate Shugak, learning that her uncle left all his possessions to her in his will comes as a surprise.

Most notable amongst Kate’s inheritance is a letter from Sam asking her to find his father. Before she can begin to fully carry out the instruction, Kate is threatened. It soon becomes clear to her that fulfilling Sam’ last wish might endanger her life, especially when long lost family secrets begin to emerge.

This novel departs somewhat from the humor that is prominent in the books that precede Though Not Dead. A return to her more serious approach to writing, Dana’s story here is layered and complex, especially when compared to the Kate Shugak books that came before.

She also provides readers with a detailed map that matters even more than what one might find in most books, primarily because it helps readers gain an accurate sense of the story’s location. Dana emphasizes the relationship between the characters and she gives them a sense of sincerity, avoiding unnecessary melodrama.

The mystery isn’t wholly ignored, though it doesn’t receive nearly as much prominence as it deserves. Dana endeavors to educate her readers about Alaskan history and it complements her work.

:A Grave Denied: Len Dreyer was always a mystery. They all knew he was a handyman for hire in the Park near Niniltna. However, not even Kate Shugak knew anything of note about him, this despite her intention to ask for his help in constructing a cabin on her property.

By the time Len’s body is found with the hole of a shotgun blast in his chest, he has been missing for months; not that anyone noticed. When Alaska State Trooper Jim Chopin asks the Park’s unofficial Private Investigator to delve into Len’s background, Kate seizes upon the opportunity for gainful employment, unaware of the danger waiting at the end of her investigation.

There are a lot of subplots running beneath A Grave Denied, and they are skillfully and masterfully intertwined. Kate continues to grow as a character, healing from her losses and trying to reassemble the piece of her life, even while the unexpected burden of responsibility complicates her determination to seek justice.