J.K. Rowling Books

J.K. Rowling is one of the several pen names (including Robert Galbraith) of the British author and filmmaker whose birth name is Joanne Rowling. She is renowned most notably for the Harry Potter series whose featured character is Harry Potter. The first novel under the pseudonym J.K. Rowling was released in mid-1997 and the series of novels is shelved as fantasy genre.

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JK Rowling was born Joanne Rowling in the town of Yate, Gloucestershire in 1965. It wasn’t until she started writing that she added the K to her name, which stands for Kathleen, a ‘made-up’ middle name, as she was not given one at birth. Although seen as a flag-bearer for many things Scottish, Rowling did not move to Scotland until 1993, when she moved to Edinburgh to be closer to her sister, after spending time living in England and in Portugal.

It was after the move to Edinburgh that JK Rowling was able to finish the first instalment of her Harry Potter series, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. Rowling had started the first book in the Harry Potter series in 1990, but it was not until 1995 that the book was actually finished. However, it would not be until 1997 that Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone was published in the UK after a lengthy process of submitting the book to a dozen publishing houses.

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, as the name suggests, focuses on the boy wizard Harry Potter, and chronicles his first year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, as well as that of his friends Hermione Granger and Ron Weasley. Harry’s first year is spent trying to stop the evil wizard Voldemort from returning, whom had tried to kill Harry as an infant. As well as this, Harry must also juggle his blossoming relationships as well as his school work.

The rest of the books in the series follow a similar theme, with Voldemort an ever-present threat throughout, as well as focusing on the importance of friendship in Harry’s life. The films made of the series also follow these theme closely and try to stay as close to the plot of the books as possible, although given the length of the books in comparison to the running times of the films, several plot points had to be removed.

Away from the world of wizardry in Harry Potter, JK Rowling created the character Robert Galbraith. However, this character would not feature in any books, but instead would write them. Robert Galbraith would turn out to be the pen name that Rowling would release the Cormoran Strike series under, featuring the aforementioned Cormoran Strike, a private investigator. The first book in the Cormoran Strike series, The Cuckoo’s Calling, was released in 2013 to critical success.

Outside of writing, JK Rowling is a noted philanthropist and devotes a lot of time and money in raising awareness of multiple sclerosis, as well as child poverty and adult illiteracy. She also came under fire from pro Scottish independence campaigners for her donation to the ‘Better Together’ campaign, as well as likening certain elements of the Scottish Nationalist movement to the Death Eaters from the Harry Potter series of books.

The character Harry James Potter is two years shy of teenage when he realizes that he is a witch. To polish his talent, Potter seeks professional training, consequently, enrolling in the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardly, truncated Hogwarts. At the institution, the travails of Potter include nipping in the bud the ill-conceived plans of the overambitious and malicious antagonist Lord Voldemort; Voldemort, who has an inferiority complex, is intent on immortalizing himself, conquering other witchcraft practitioners, and consolidating power by deposing the government mandated to oversee wizardly.

The series’ initial work, Philosopher’s Stone, starts by showcasing an eleven-year-old and decade-long orphaned boy who has had enlightenment about his crude bewitching talent. The first notable place where the boy, a social outcast of the mainstream society, goes to is the fictitious Hogwarts following his admission to the institution. Once there, his classmates and bosom friends assist him to unearth the gory events which transpired in the run-up to the death of his parents (his mother Lily Potter and father Harry Potter). Voldemort had a hand in the deaths. The events which transpire and the travails of the protagonist, cements J.K. Rowling’s rightful place as a world-renowned master storyteller, and has won her many awards awards including Nestle Smarties Book Prize for the first book.

J.K. Rowling Awards

J.K. Rowling has won a laundry list of awards over the years. Here is a list of the most notable ones. She won the coveted Nestle Smarties Book Prize in 1997, 1998, and 1999 for three of her serialized works; 1999 Whitbread Awards (Children’s Book); Hugo Award for Best Novel in 2000; and Bram Stoker Award in 2003. She won the British Book Awards in the following categories: Children’s Book of the Year in 1998 and 1999, Author of the Year in 2000, Book of the Year in 2006, and Outstanding Achievement in 2008. Incidentally, she has won many other unbelievable multiple awards and been nominated over and over again. This is, perhaps, summed up by a mind-blowing fact; she won an award and sometimes multiple awards, often simultaneously, almost every year between 1997 and 2012.

J.K. Rowling Books Into Movies/TV Shows

In the context of filmography, various literary works of J.K. Rowling have been adapted for the silver screen. By the same token, there are other ongoing projects. For instance, her 2007 masterpiece Deathly Hallows, which is the seventh in the series, was released in theaters in late 2010; the adaptation has two parts and was released under the same title, and starred Daniel Radcliffe.

J.K. Rowling’s standalone 2012 novel titled The Casual Vacancy was adapted into a TV show, albeit a miniseries; it aired on BBC One in early 2015 and starred Rory Kinnear. Her Harry Potter-based 2001 novel, titled Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them, was adapted into a similarly titled film and premiered in late 2016; the starring actor is Eddie Redmayne. The Cormoran Strike series has been earmarked for adaptation into TV series and is slated for release in 2017 on BBC One. According to a report made in late 2016, Tom Burke has been tapped to feature in the starring role.

Best J.K. Rowling Books

Ordinarily, the best of J.K. Rowling books are the Harry Potter series of books, especially the following triad. Philosopher’s Stone is (if you put the sequel aside) J.K. Rowling’s most sought-after. After whetting her readers’ appetite for yet more of her literary works, J.K. Rowling then produced her well-received Chamber of Secrets, to a warm reception; hereby, Potter is fed up with his hosts and is looking forward to another school term when a bizarre messenger informs him that his upcoming term is ill-fated.

By and by, Hogwarts is haunted and the persons of interest could be anyone, including Potter. Prisoner of Azkaban, is a brainy twist which worsens Potter’s predicament. A murderous inmate is on the loose and is being hunted by soul-feasting prison guards; the now teenage Potter thinks Hogwarts is a haven but, whether a figment or not, he senses something spying on him at night. Is a doomy prophesy manifesting itself?

Other Books Series You May Like

Readers who like the fantasy work of J.K. Rowling also liked “A Series of Unfortunate Events” by Lemony Snicket. The fantasy books therein revolve around the lives and times of children orphaned due to a fatal fire accident. Another series worth its salt is “Protector of the Small” by Tamora Pierce; this fantasy recounts the experiences of heroine Keladry in the Tortall kingdom. Diana Wynne Jones’ “Chrestomanci” fantasy series, like Harry Potter’s Ministry of Magic, also involves a magic oversight body in England’s Chrestomanci Castle.

JK Rowling F.A.Q.

Q: What does JK stand for?

A: JK stands for Joanne Kathleen. Joanne being Rowling’s name from birth, and Kathleen being a middle name she created for writing purposes.

Q: Does JK Rowling only write children’s books?

A: No, JK Rowling does not only write children’s books. As well as the Harry Potter series, Rowling has written The Casual Vacancy, which is aimed at the adult fiction market, as well as writing the Cormoran Strike series of books under the pen name Robert Galbraith.